Seven Steps to Great Unit Test Names

You can find many good blog posts on what to name your tests. We present instead an appropriate strategy for when and how to think about test naming.
  1. Don't sweat the initial name. A bit of thought about what you're testing is essential, but don't expend much time on the name yet. Type in a name, quickly. Use AAA or Given-When-Then to help derive one. It might be terrible--we've named tests "DoesSomething" before we knew exactly what they needed to accomplish. We've also written extensively long test names to capture a spewn-out train of thought. No worries--you'll revisit the name soon enough.
  2. Write the test. As you design the test, you'll figure out precisely what the test needs to do. You pretty much have to, otherwise you aren't getting past this step! :-) When the test fails, look at the combination of the fixture name, test method name, and assertion message. These three should (eventually) uniquely and clearly describe the intent of the test. Make any obvious corrections, like removing redundancy or improving the assertion message. Don't agonize about the name yet; it's still early in the process.
  3. Get it to pass. Focus on simply getting the test to pass. This is not the time to worry about the test name. If you have to wait any significant time for your test run, start thinking about a more appropriate name for the test (see step 4).
  4. Rename based on content. Once a test works, you must revisit its name. Re-read the test. Now that you know what it does, you should find it much easier to come up with a concise name. If you had an overly verbose test name, you should be able to eliminate some noise words by using more abstract or simpler terms. You may need to look at other tests or talk to someone to make sure you're using appropriate terms from the domain language.
  5. Rename based on a holistic fixture view. In Eclipse, for example, you can do a ctrl-O to bring up an outline view showing the names for all related tests. However you review all the test names, make sure your new test's name is consistent with the others. The test is a member of a collection, so consider the collection as a system of names.
  6. Rename and reorganize other tests as appropriate. Often you'll question the names of the other tests. Take a few moments to improve them, with particular focus given to the impact of the new test's name. You might also recognize the need to split the current fixture into multiple fixtures.
  7. Reconsider the name with each revisit. Unit tests can act as great living documentation -- but only if intentionally written as such. Try to use the tests as your first and best understanding of how a class behaves. The first thing you should do when challenged with a code change is read the related tests. The second thing you should do is rename any unclear test names.
The test names you choose may seem wonderful and clear to you, but you know what you intended when you wrote them. They might not be nearly as meaningful to someone who wasn't involved with the initial test-writing effort. Make sure you have some form of review to vet the test names. An uninvolved developer should be able to understand the test as a stand-alone artifact - not having to consult with the test's author (you). If pair programming, it's still wise to get a third set of eyes on the test names before integrating.

Unit tests require a significant investment of effort, but renaming a test is cheap and safe. Don’t resist incrementally driving toward the best name possible. Continuous renaming of tests is an easy way of helping ensure that your investment will return appropriate value.